Daily Prompt: Learning style

I hope this is permitted by The Daily Post … It’s a short section from my book; and I use it for the simple reason that today’s ‘assignment’ could scarcely be more to the point. I might have written it especially. But of course I didn’t: I wrote it several years ago, as everything else within my memoir.

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«Another and very different aspect of creativity that Chic brought into my life – he was a natural teacher and I was ever ready to be taught by him – was web-authoring. He had taken me into the world of PCs years before, once he’d mastered them; and we ended up having one each, at which we would sit side by side in absolute companionship and pleasure, doing whatever we did.

I evinced a wish to learn how to make my own site when I developed a passion for an Italian footballer, some time early in 1990, in the days when SBS used to telecast a summary of the previous weekend’s fixtures from the Italian Lega Calcio. He was (and still is, of course) Roberto Baggio, il divin Codino, playing like a little god; and we derived huge pleasure not only from his game but the game, becoming aficionados of the worst kind and able to quote statistics at the drop of a hat. In my usual fashion I became a hero-worshipper of this beautiful and talented bloke; and my beautiful and talented bloke became my willing accomplice in helping me turn the hero-worship into something potentially useful.

Chic searched out web-authoring software I could use without screaming and tearing my hair. He had to get me into the web-authoring mindset; to nurse me through the most basic learning curves; to progress me on to more sophisticated areas; to teach me to THINK FIRST and actually plan what I wanted to do (so as to prevent yells of frustration when I realized what I’d left out that completely stuffed everything done subsequently); to ensure that I never forgot to save as I was working. I created with this inexhaustible assistance The Roberto Baggio Italian-English Website; and it was hugely popular amongst the Web’s Baggio fans as it provided Italian articles about Roby, together with full translations and photo galleries, thus keeping lots of people happy.

Even though I found some software learning challenging to the point of difficult to the point of impossible, with concomitant ire, Chic was rarely angry with me. He would often leave his TV viewing and wander casually into the office when he heard me swearing, and look calmly over my shoulder, ascertaining the problem without difficulty. If I was incandescent with rage he’d make me laugh by pretending to be trembling with fear, then sit down next to me at his PC and show me how to fix whatever ballsup I’d just created.»