A grand evening out !

There are some bad times about being a published author whose book is never going to be a runaway best-seller … and then again there are the good times. One of these I experienced last night (Tuesday: it’s 10:30am Wednesday, Downunder); and I want to share it with you.

Btw, in Strine language, one of the ways of indicating the use of the second person plural as opposed to the ditto singular is to render the word ‘you’ into plural ! Thus – youse. [grin] This originated with newly-arrived Australians who struggle not only to learn English, but to learn it (the poor bastards !) as spoken by Aussies; and so themselves coin words such as ‘youse’ because it seems logical to them. Ain’t it wonderful?

So in fact I want to share this with youse!   😀

Anyway …

It was a small library, tucked away in a shopping centre in a busy suburb – delightfully peaceful at 6 pm, as that’s usually closing time. I arrived earliest – often do, as I have to travel by bus which entails more than one trip, and am thus forced to take the first very early in case it’s late and makes me lose the second. You get me, I’m sure … And there in the lecture room was the most WONDERFUL spread ! – chopped fruit, dried fruits, cheese, biscuits, guacamole, brownies … I can’t begin to remember everything, and for me that’s a weird one ! Happily, attendees began to arrive (many had been there before and knew the routine) quite soon, and everyone got stuck in, and the ambience created by such a communal feast was just super.

My talk – yesyes, it could indeed be described as ‘my rave’, I will admit it – was duly delivered with not only my own enthusiasm (there’s nothing I like to talk about more than my life with Stringer and the book about it), but also that of the audience members. What with the occasional question along the way and many at the end, I was still sitting there burbling on at twenty to eight, having started at six-thirty.

And then the pièce de resistance: the evening’s organiser made me a little presentation by way of thanks of a most LOVELY print! – one, as I said truthfully, right up my alley! It’s an early scene of Coogee Bay, close to where we all were in Randwick, all set up with the hanging paraphernalia and everything. I nearly cried. I don’t give a rat’s if they do this for every speaker who doesn’t receive payment: no other library has got within a bull’s roar of such thoughtfulness, and I am so impressed with the way this little one goes about its business that I could only wish I had more things to lecture on ! (Please forgive my hopelessness as a photog.: I have no idea how to prevent the flash’s going off, so was obliged to tilt the print. At least you get a good idea, eh?)

And to cap it all off, here something I found in my Comments when I staggered out of bed this-morning …

The evening will remain firmly in my memory as a highlight for … ever.   😀

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78 thoughts on “A grand evening out !

  1. Complimenti vivissimi cara Margaret Rose. Una bella serata quella che ha trascorso e che bella stampa ti è stata consegnata. Bravissima.
    Ciao, ora io vado a dormire. A domani. Pat 🙂

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  2. My Dear MR, that was good reading! May more good things happen to You! What the members of that library did makes us keep believing in ‘Goodness!’ And I think I have further shortened Your name! Love and Regards.

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  3. Like I said, I do like your take on Life, Amy! – and a good heart goes all the day … Now I’m going to have to find out what old song that comes from …

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  4. Wonderful story, M.R.! That is a great photo. I can see why it means so much. And a great note to wake up to!

    That word, “youse” is frequently heard in parts of New York City, too. I don’t know what the origins in NY are but there was a funny movie some years ago with Joe Pesci where that word youse, is part of the joke. I wonder if it is pronounced the same there as it is in NY?

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  5. I have a co-worker who says “youse”. She even types it that way in her emails. It’s the language of the universe! Nice photo and congrats on a positive and successful speaking engagement.

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  6. And here I thought youse was from Brooklyn, NY. Also, it never occurred to me that it might have originated as a plural form of you. Maybe remembering that will help me cringe a little less when I hear it.

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  7. Congratulations – it sounds like a wonderful evening! We also have “youse” in Saskatchewan, where I’m from. Sometimes it’s just “youse”, and sometimes it’s “youse guys”. For all those grammarians who lament its use, I say it serves the English language right for thinking it could make sure with only one second person pronoun!

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  8. I wish I had known about your talk, I would have gone, given that Randwick is just up the road from me.
    And BTW, if I may paraphrase, there are also some bad times about being a SELF-published author (like me) whose books are never going to be runaway best-sellers. (Though I keep hoping that miracle will happen!) I’ve had good times, too, but am not likely ever to be invited to speak at a library. 😉

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  9. A wonderful evening and a well deserved presentation. Youse is used over in England by those born near the Tyne in a similar way; to make “you” into a plural.

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  10. Lovely, Em! – and heartily agreed with! 🙂 Throughout all these comments on it I’m learning how insular my thinking on it has been – with pleasure.

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  11. I was not, my dear. I have arranged all these talks myself. As my publishers have provided me with zero publicity on the eastern seaboard, everything that could even remotely fall under the word is mine.
    Btw: here/the nav menu/”ATLMD”/events …

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  12. Am thrilled that all went so well and you were duly appreciated! What a lovely thought giving you a print to remind you of the occasion. It is so good to be appreciated, all that bus travel etc…..

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  13. Thank you so much! – I would follow your site but that the Google Translator turns it into absolute rubbish English and I can’t follow anything. 😦

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  14. Truly, it was, me love: and as I say, thrilling even if it’s what they do for everyone. But Eric emailed me to say “Many thanks for your fantastic talk last night! All the guests comments are overwhelmingly positive! Out of the dozen people in the room, a large number are participants of the library’s “Writing for Pleasure” group and they were absolutely fascinated with your insights into the writing process and the publishing industry..” so I remain tickled pink. 🙂

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  15. Well done M.R. You are so lucky you can talk well and get your audience so enthusiastic. I am absolutely hopeless in verbal matters. Its as though you haven’t a thought in your head and can’t string two words together – not a good look for an author. I’m working on overcoming this with toastmasters so M.R. I am in total awe of you and hope you sold many. The print looks great.

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  16. As a librarian by training I feel quite chuffed about that little library and its generosity and enthusiasm. It doesn’t take a lot of money to make something special I think – just a lot of thought. So glad you had a good evening.

    As for the print, at least you could think to tilt it. BTW On most of my digital cameras, you just need to toggle a button button that does the flash mode. There are usually three options – Auto, On and Off. In some cameras you need to with to P (program) mode first but others you don’t. It’s usually easy once you know how. What sort of camera do you have? Maybe it’s a fancy Stringer-like one?

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  17. Nikon Coolpix 5700. Ten years old. Still works like a charm. I imagine. l’ll try the downloaded manual.
    I’m a fan of the Margaret Martin Library, and how! 🙂
    Thank-you, Sue !

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  18. Here are instructions from a Yahoo Forum which is hopefully for your camera or one like it:

    The circular button that surrounds the “OK” button on your Nikon Coolpix S570 is a multipurpose switch that takes on different functions, based on the current mode selection (playback, still (Auto), video mode, etc.). In “Auto” mode, you can control the flash, so let’s focus on that (no pun intended).

    How to turn off the flash (in “Auto” mode):
    Press the top of the circular button to access the flash settings. A graphical menu will appear showing five flash mode choices. These are, from top to bottom:
    1. Auto
    2. Red-eye reduction
    3. Off (the icon shows a lightning bolt with a slash through it)
    4. Force on
    5. Backlighting

    To force your flash off, choose number 3, above

    This is very similar to what I do on my Canon.

    Hope this helps.

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  19. Of such modest gestures are great bouts of joy born. But also recognition that you put heart and soul into it. Just think how much better life would be if we all entered into it with such enthusiasm and selflessness. I am truly happy for you M.R. And indeed for your audience.

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  20. And in the smallest of things arises the treasure..I would have loved to have been there as I’m sure you gave a most wonderful talk and am so pleased to see the reception you received.
    Love the print!!

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  21. I know reading your blogs have often made my day! I only recently staggered in to this ‘little’ corner of the internet, but you were the first one to welcome me and I have been checking in on you pretty regular ever since! I can’t wait to read your book!

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  22. Sounds like a wonderful evening!

    As opposed to “youse” the one I like here is when “you all” gets thrown together to become “y’all” or from my time in Texas when I heard the “all y’all” or even better, “all y’alls”

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  23. Wow your comments to this post is exploding!! M.R. this was one sweet story – what a wonderful stage and beautiful scene. Congratulations ~

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  24. Margaret Rose, I want to personally thank you for your support of my article I wrote for The Talking Violin, regarding cellphones on planes. It really meant a lot to me!! (((HUGS))) Amy

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  25. What a heat-felt narrative! Meaning, it felt my heart with warmth and that special kind of light sadness, when you are grateful for what you had but still painfully miss it every single day. Wish I could be in the auditorium – you’d hear me sobbing 🙂 Glad the evening at the library exceeded your expectations! Cheers to many more to come!
    Ah, you would not believe how much I missed linguistic studies!!! Thank you for “youse”!

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  26. Wot a nice man! 🙂 Thanks very much indeed, Andrew: coming from a bloke who has a functioning brain and uses it to think deeply, that’s a big plus for me.

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  27. Isn’t it a little ripper, Lynne? – I LOVE our history – it’s so small … We Aussies can feel almost as if we’re part of it; and photos like this – well … I was honestly and truly thrilled beyond words. There now!

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  28. That’s a sentiment for which I am most grateful (note grammar!). 😉
    I’m always happy when someone knocks on the door and says “You might be worth checking on, g’day!” – and I hope that those things you referred to in your most recent post mean that you can now start informing me on CRAFT. Love crochet and knitting. Love to read others’ input. Get busy! [grin]

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  29. Hevvings! – that’s a really individual one, Megz … I’m beginning to feel silly for having made this aside, as just about everyone from everywhere has said “here too”! 🙂

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  30. The library was lucky to have you! I am very glad that you have appreciative audiences, and in some cases appreciative venues. Congratulations on another success. Keep ’em coming!

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  31. Thanks so much, clever and talented Mary!!
    It gives me the greatest pleasure to receive comments about stuff I post, as it’s exactly like having little chats …

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  32. You have my dream life. Tucked away in a cupboard under the stairs, like the best Harry Potter. And the call you Mrs. It really has the author-wide. In Sweden we only use first names so being adress Ms or Mrs is just a dream. Love your description of your little talk, even though your book isn´t a bestseller.

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  33. Thank you my Swedish friend! I’m happy to say that now I’ve listened to audio books of the whole Harry Potter series (read by Stephen Fry, who quite obviously LOVED them), I understand your reference! 🙂

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  34. I was Head Prefect of my school in 1960. Needless to say, all the worst characteristics have stayed with me. [grin]

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  35. Ah. Harry Potter is great. 🙂 I have just seen the films, but seen them like 100 times each. Been thinking about reading them but there is so much I wan´t to read I never seem to find the time. Like audiobooks also. Do your book come in audio?

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  36. Love it and your so humble too lol. So tell me, I have been wondering whether to place a few simple patterns in blog or just pics of projects and personal notes. Which do you think would be more interesting to you?

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  37. Let me think about it, and get back to you: while I’m going through my emails from overnight (I don’t use the Reader at all), I’m a bit distracted. Believe me, I WILL come back, OK?

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  38. Yes. It is good to rest the eyes. Love to read but I have some eyeproblems of all the computeruse, reading and working so it´s great! 🙂 My eyes get tired and have problems adjusting to the surrounding.

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  39. Yes, I have glases and go on a regular basis to the eye-guy who I don´t know the name of in English. But they are fine. They just get exhausted by the computer use he says. It is much better now, when I´m not working. Before I where working 8h a day by a computer and that was not so fun for my eyes. My own computerscreen is much better (my Mac) and my new friend, my iPad.

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  40. Speaking my humble/modest self [grin], I would say that simple patterns are of zero interest. I’m always looking for things to knit that AREN’T all in one piece (I can’t manage them!), or new squares … So I’d say the latter, Lenna … But that is just me, after all.

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  41. Honestly, Lenna … unless your blog reflects you as the person you are, it won’t succeed. By which I mean only that it’s YOUR gut feeling that matters, not anyone else’s, OK?
    Go for it, kiddo ! 🙂

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  42. MR, that was fabulous. I smiled and at thinking about you rambling on and wished I were there to hear it. I can definitely see you getting all chocked up over the gift. I would have, too. Hugs, my dear friend.

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  43. This slipped by me. Imagine that! I think I know why – not that you give a shit. So I shan’t waste your time in explaining it. But I am grateful, you know. Of course you do. 🙂

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  44. I was pretty pleased to discover this great site.
    I wanted to thank you for ones time for this wonderful read!!
    I definitely enjoyed every little bit of it and i also have you saved to fav to see new things on your blog.

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  45. So you were at Randwick …? I ask only because I just did another talk today at Ashfield …
    I’m so HAPPY to get this kind of response, you can’t imagine O nameless person. 😉 It gives me the impetus to go on and approach more libraries ! Hope you continue to enjoy the blog. If you click on the follow button at the bottom of the page (at the moment – it might move), you’ll be advised every time I post.

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